JDK 11 java.base.jmod - Base Module

JDK 11 java.base.jmod is the JMOD file for JDK 11 Base module.

JDK 11 Base module compiled class files are stored in \fyicenter\jdk-11.0.1\jmods\java.base.jmod.

JDK 11 Base module compiled class files are also linked and stored in the \fyicenter\jdk-11.0.1\lib\modules JImage file.

JDK 11 Base module source code files are stored in \fyicenter\jdk-11.0.1\lib\src.zip\java.base.

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java/text/Normalizer.java

/*
 * Copyright (c) 2005, 2015, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
 * ORACLE PROPRIETARY/CONFIDENTIAL. Use is subject to license terms.
 *
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/*
 *******************************************************************************
 * (C) Copyright IBM Corp. 1996-2005 - All Rights Reserved                     *
 *                                                                             *
 * The original version of this source code and documentation is copyrighted   *
 * and owned by IBM, These materials are provided under terms of a License     *
 * Agreement between IBM and Sun. This technology is protected by multiple     *
 * US and International patents. This notice and attribution to IBM may not    *
 * to removed.                                                                 *
 *******************************************************************************
 */

package java.text;

import sun.text.normalizer.NormalizerBase;

/**
 * This class provides the method <code>normalize</code> which transforms Unicode
 * text into an equivalent composed or decomposed form, allowing for easier
 * sorting and searching of text.
 * The <code>normalize</code> method supports the standard normalization forms
 * described in
 * <a href="http://www.unicode.org/unicode/reports/tr15/tr15-23.html">
 * Unicode Standard Annex #15 &mdash; Unicode Normalization Forms</a>.
 * <p>
 * Characters with accents or other adornments can be encoded in
 * several different ways in Unicode.  For example, take the character A-acute.
 * In Unicode, this can be encoded as a single character (the "composed" form):
 *
 * <pre>
 *      U+00C1    LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH ACUTE</pre>
 *
 * or as two separate characters (the "decomposed" form):
 *
 * <pre>
 *      U+0041    LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A
 *      U+0301    COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT</pre>
 *
 * To a user of your program, however, both of these sequences should be
 * treated as the same "user-level" character "A with acute accent".  When you
 * are searching or comparing text, you must ensure that these two sequences are
 * treated as equivalent.  In addition, you must handle characters with more than
 * one accent. Sometimes the order of a character's combining accents is
 * significant, while in other cases accent sequences in different orders are
 * really equivalent.
 * <p>
 * Similarly, the string "ffi" can be encoded as three separate letters:
 *
 * <pre>
 *      U+0066    LATIN SMALL LETTER F
 *      U+0066    LATIN SMALL LETTER F
 *      U+0069    LATIN SMALL LETTER I</pre>
 *
 * or as the single character
 *
 * <pre>
 *      U+FB03    LATIN SMALL LIGATURE FFI</pre>
 *
 * The ffi ligature is not a distinct semantic character, and strictly speaking
 * it shouldn't be in Unicode at all, but it was included for compatibility
 * with existing character sets that already provided it.  The Unicode standard
 * identifies such characters by giving them "compatibility" decompositions
 * into the corresponding semantic characters.  When sorting and searching, you
 * will often want to use these mappings.
 * <p>
 * The <code>normalize</code> method helps solve these problems by transforming
 * text into the canonical composed and decomposed forms as shown in the first
 * example above. In addition, you can have it perform compatibility
 * decompositions so that you can treat compatibility characters the same as
 * their equivalents.
 * Finally, the <code>normalize</code> method rearranges accents into the
 * proper canonical order, so that you do not have to worry about accent
 * rearrangement on your own.
 * <p>
 * The W3C generally recommends to exchange texts in NFC.
 * Note also that most legacy character encodings use only precomposed forms and
 * often do not encode any combining marks by themselves. For conversion to such
 * character encodings the Unicode text needs to be normalized to NFC.
 * For more usage examples, see the Unicode Standard Annex.
 *
 * @since 1.6
 */
public final class Normalizer {

   private Normalizer() {};

    /**
     * This enum provides constants of the four Unicode normalization forms
     * that are described in
     * <a href="http://www.unicode.org/unicode/reports/tr15/tr15-23.html">
     * Unicode Standard Annex #15 &mdash; Unicode Normalization Forms</a>
     * and two methods to access them.
     *
     * @since 1.6
     */
    public static enum Form {

        /**
         * Canonical decomposition.
         */
        NFD,

        /**
         * Canonical decomposition, followed by canonical composition.
         */
        NFC,

        /**
         * Compatibility decomposition.
         */
        NFKD,

        /**
         * Compatibility decomposition, followed by canonical composition.
         */
        NFKC
    }

    /**
     * Normalize a sequence of char values.
     * The sequence will be normalized according to the specified normalization
     * from.
     * @param src        The sequence of char values to normalize.
     * @param form       The normalization form; one of
     *                   {@link java.text.Normalizer.Form#NFC},
     *                   {@link java.text.Normalizer.Form#NFD},
     *                   {@link java.text.Normalizer.Form#NFKC},
     *                   {@link java.text.Normalizer.Form#NFKD}
     * @return The normalized String
     * @throws NullPointerException If <code>src</code> or <code>form</code>
     * is null.
     */
    public static String normalize(CharSequence src, Form form) {
        return NormalizerBase.normalize(src.toString(), form);
    }

    /**
     * Determines if the given sequence of char values is normalized.
     * @param src        The sequence of char values to be checked.
     * @param form       The normalization form; one of
     *                   {@link java.text.Normalizer.Form#NFC},
     *                   {@link java.text.Normalizer.Form#NFD},
     *                   {@link java.text.Normalizer.Form#NFKC},
     *                   {@link java.text.Normalizer.Form#NFKD}
     * @return true if the sequence of char values is normalized;
     * false otherwise.
     * @throws NullPointerException If <code>src</code> or <code>form</code>
     * is null.
     */
    public static boolean isNormalized(CharSequence src, Form form) {
        return NormalizerBase.isNormalized(src.toString(), form);
    }
}

java/text/Normalizer.java

 

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Release date: 2018-11-04
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